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Perhaps the only surviving expression of Adwick Uniform

As every other CQD site before the UK referendum this website uses a CSS style sheet based on the former Adwick School’s uniform. The style sheet is still retained on the Archive for the Yorkshire Viking Blog and on this memorial site. If you are a former Adwick School pupil and would like to use the WordPress theme for your own blog, do get in touch!

My personal twin blogs have now dropped the Adwick Theme. The reasons for this are explained on the Archive for the Yorkshire Viking page.

Monthly Archives: October 2012

A Tale of Two Schools

Snowman

A snowman waits to welcome me to Vestbygd School

Today I was out at Vestbygd. It’s a little village 45 kilometres (or 28 miles) away from the municipal centre of Lødingen.

As you can see, the winter has arrived. The white stuff came earlier this week. It makes for very demanding driving, since yesterday it rained, and now the temperature hovers around zero. On my journey I saw two big lorries that had got stuck.

The Albino Moose

This albino moose has stood in the foyer of Vestbygd School since the last time I was here, some 18 years ago

Fortunately I arrived at the school safely, being welcomed by the year’s first snowman. The school brass band is putting on the musical When the Robbers Came to Cardamom Town, and I am playing the piano. Today we had a rehearsal from ten o’ clock until five.

Rehearsal at Vestbygd School

Rehearsal at Vestbygd School

Because I used to work here between 1994 and 1998, it was a strange feeling. It is almost as time has stopped still. Yet like my own school in England, this school is marked for demolition. Actually, the decision was deferred last week, but suffice it to say that this is how things are now looking.

In the breaks between our rehearsal, I walked around the school, and the experience was rather surreal. This is the one place in Norway with a connection to my own soon-to-be-demolished school. I took two of its pupils in 1997 to Adwick School. Moreover, I realized that my first meeting with Vestbygd School was this very weekend in October eighteen years ago. I had been on a youth camp with the church, and we had all slept at the school from Friday to Sunday. When the band ate pizza during our lunch break from rehearsal, I realized that the last time I was in the kitchen there was indeed on that camp!

The School Eating Area

School Kitchen: Eating Area. The last time I was here was in 1994!

If, as now seems likely, the school goes the way of Adwick, it is for very different reasons. Vestbygd School was built at a time when there were some 150 children there. Today there are about 23. This means that, for the council that is already cash-strapped, the buildings are just too expensive. However, their proposal to move the old people out the old people’s home and move the children and nursery there has stirred local feelings…

Still, it seems odd that at the time when my former school in Doncaster is now entering its final days, the one school that has a connection to it here might also go the same way. I shall keep you posted!

Time for Self Congratulation

Well that is it! My oldest blog has had the most radical re-brand in its six year history. For my own part I am very pleased with myself.

However, the greatest thanks really have to go to my successor at Finnsnes. There is no question that Jon Blamire and his Arctic Organist have really influenced the direction of this English blog. Last year saw the launch of the Norwegian sister blog, which while satisfying my wish to fully use the culture to which I now belong, was at the expense of the original blog that now needed a new purpose for its existence.

Into this comes the Arctic Organist like a breath of Arctic fresh air! Just the name “Arctic Organist”, and the address that went with it – so well thought out and easy to remember! I must confess that I find it compelling reading too. It is over two decades since I was a newcomer in Norway, and it is a strange feeling reading the experiences of those for whom Norway is new today.

So it was that I set about a complete remake, with a new URL to boot. The symbolism is the same (I have always liked using symbols). The older Violet Cross was meant to display my Christian belief and my origin. Adwick’s defunct colours were shown here by the green and black colour bars – the white by implication in the space between. That symbol, described here, was first used on my compositions at Huddersfield Polytechnic, and was until last week my profile picture on Facebook.

The newer symbolism is really quite brazen about the Adwick connection. After all, they are going to be knocking the whole place down soon, so why not? Superimposed over is the same Greek Cross, although green this time (in keeping with the classical green, white, and black colour scheme) and the famous raven of the Vikings…

Needless to say, I am very pleased with my handiwork this time round. I think I just might have a blog now that is worthy of the competition 155 miles further North!

Make sure you visit the Arctic Organist. You won’t be disappointed!

The Decline of Adwick’s Uniform

Yes I still do have my school tie... :)

The Adwick School Tie (defunct)

Preface – Old Article from 2000

The final seat of authority in childhood, my last school has (to my thinking) acquired an aura of mystique. As I have commented in another post before they were demolished, its old buildings were all that remained of a world that has since passed.

Trying to see when that world actually ended is a heavy exercise in the existential! Of course at the simplest level, it ended at about three o’clock on Thursday, 21st May 1981. That was the day before I was supposed to leave, but for fear of some unpleasant things that were rumoured for the 22nd May itself I had decided not to bother going in that last day. On this final afternoon, I thought I was being very brave “twagging” the very last period, in order that I could slip out unnoticed well before the school bell, and hiding out in my final minutes completely unnoticed in one of the music department’s practice rooms!

Yet of course, I am talking about something more than this. For in the immediate aftermath of my schooling, even the first two years after I had left, I did not think that Adwick School had become any different from the school I had known. It was still the place I used to go to, and nothing more. Eventually, as my own childhood began to recede into time, I began to see my school in more nostalgic terms.

At this time I still had active contact with people in that area, and between the years 1985 and 1988 I first noticed some changes to the uniform that I had worn. This was when I observed pupils leaving the school at the end of the day. Those changes were not very large ones. Yet for the first time there then was a clear distinction between that time I remembered and the school world I saw now.

In 1988 I took up a place at the former Polytechnic of Huddersfield. Sometimes I should return by bus at the weekend. This invariably passed Adwick School just as school was ending. In my years at Huddersfield, I thus noticed the continuing changes to what had once been a very smart uniform. By then it was seeming far less strictly observed, and the overall changes were much more noticeable.

Having emigrated from the United Kingdom in 1991, I was to have yet one more experience of the school world at Adwick. This was in 1997, when I travelled back there with two Norwegian school children. One of them, indeed, borrowed my old school tie, and they were enrolled at the school for half a day. However, by now many pupils were not wearing the uniform, or only parts of it, and I had the impression even then that its days were drawing to an end.

In 2000, a year before my father passed away, I wrote a small article concerning this on my home page – the blog wasn’t invented back then! This article was subsequently revised after my father had died, and indeed after the uniform had finally been replaced. In 2002, Adwick School was renamed Doncaster North Technology College, and together with the new branding for the school, the old uniform was replaced by a modern dress code.

I am aware that the older Doncaster North Technology College, which itself has now been superseded by the new Outwood Academy Adwick, called their dress code a “uniform”. However for the purposes of this discussion, I prefer to restrict the term “uniform” to a certain type of  school clothing. The technology college’s “uniform” is far better described as a dress code for these purposes. Nevertheless, from what I can gather about the new academy, there is once again a uniform, as smart and strictly applied as ours in my days. That is however completely different to the green, white and black uniform we wore at Adwick School.

I am republishing here my earlier article, after its revisions in 2002. Take yourself back therefore to that year. These are my observations regarding the decline and ultimate loss of the Adwick School uniform…. They are only my opinions, and in no way meant to be authoritative!

Note: this article was first published in year 2000, when the last vestiges of school uniform still existed at Adwick High. The only changes made are therefore those of tense. For example, “traces of its distinctive look could still be seen” was originally “traces of its distinctive look can still be seen”.

The article is otherwise republished exactly as it was first put out on the Internet, below.

Observations on School Uniform

Adwick School had a classical English school uniform. Traces of its very distinctive look could still be seen as recently as 2001, when formerly speaking the school still retained it. However by then, there could be little doubting its decline, compared to its heyday in the seventies.

That this is so I can vouchsafe myself. When I was a pupil at the end of that period, I did know about the practice of wearing the school tie in such a way that only a tiny bit could be seen poking out of the knot. However, this was then fairly new, regarded as scruffy appearance, and the vast majority of us still wore it conventionally. Indeed house tutors would upbraid us if our ties and uniform were not neatly, and correctly worn.

me

Me! In Glorious Adwick School Uniform!

This photograph to the right admittedly shows my tie in a position that would have earned such an admonishment. Yet it was taken, as I recall, at the very end of the school day, and the “slack” tie shows the photograph to be genuine: schoolboys did not as a rule pay too much attention to detail unless teachers made them. What the photograph does clearly show is the school tie with the correct knot (as opposed to the “scruffy” versions described above that later became both fashionable and, indeed, the rule rather than the exception).

Documented too are all of the uniform’s items waist up, with the sole exception of the school scarf. Had I been conscious of the photograph’s ultimate historical value to this discussion, I would definitely have taken my scarf along with me – but such things had of course never dawned on me when this photograph was taken. I was no doubt counting down the minutes to the bell (for home-time).

The photograph being old has required a good deal of editing on the computer, and this is the best I can do. I have been able to bring the green back to the blazer and tie (which had all but gone on the original), but to make this green colour like it was when the photograph was taken would unfortunately make me look rather “seasick” in the face.

Shown too is the distinctive black V-neck, which disappeared in the eighties shortly after I left school. The green and white colours of the school’s green, white, and black scheme made two stripes at the “V” of the neck and at the arms, which were folded in at the ends – though I cannot now remember how those stripes were, whether they were right at the point where the hands came out, or further up the fold.

Not shown is the equally distinctive Adwick School logo on the breast pocket. This took the form of bold black initials “AS” on a white background that filled the square of the pocket. Below this was a so-called “flash” that denoted the House (pupils belonged to Priestley, Delius, Rhodes or Moore Houses).

The Priestley flash I wore was yellow, the others were blue, green and red – if my memory serves me correct, though I cannot remember which colour corresponded to which House. The name of the House was written in clear black letters over this colour background.

The Adwick School Sixth Form also had a uniform. That was certainly not in existence a year ago, and given that I did not stay on after 16 years at school, I regret that I cannot remember the details of how exactly it was composed.

The Uniform Begins to Change

Not long after my departure from Adwick in 1981, the uniform began to change. The neighbouring school, Don Valley High School lost its uniform entirely (at least in the stricter sense of the word “uniform” required for this discussion), and although the Adwick uniform remained times were a changing.

Between the years 1985 and 1986, I observed that the first casualty of these changes was the V-neck pullover. The majority of children were now wearing plain black V-necks, without the colour stripes at the “V”. These would be clothes bought from ordinary shops, and not specially tailored uniform clothes. A very few did have the old patterns, and I suspect these were children from the more well to do areas of Sprotborough – which was still a part of Adwick’s catchment area at that time.

The V-neck became completely discarded soon afterwards. This happened in the early nineties, and by 1997 when I visited Adwick with two schoolboys from where I now live, I was told that the V-neck was still “there” theoretically – but nobody would be seen dead wearing it. Indeed I noticed how, despite the cold September air, pupils would go to school with but the protection of a shirt, their designer winter coats open.

The latter indeed, in all kinds of sundry colours now masked the look of uniform, at least when the children were outdoors. I had observed moreover that the blazer too seemed to be on the way out: the answer seemed to be to go to school without it, with an outer designer coat for protection from the elements. At the time of my visit, though, there were still plenty blazers to be seen, but those dropping them altogether were quite noticeable.

The tie was by now either not worn at all, or worn with most of the tie tucked into the shirt, and only the tip end showing out of the knot. I had the distinct impression then that the uniform’s days were numbered.

As good as all girls now wore trousers – not that there were anything wrong with that I hasten to add – but because these girls had so many colour alternatives, and because of the outer clothing that everybody wore over the uniform, the whole point did seem to be lost. The uniform no longer existed in the strict sense, though a weakened impression of uniform did admittedly hang on for dear life.

Important note: this article was revised in 2002. Outwood Academy Adwick has now reintroduced school uniform. This is a very smart one too, using purple and black with an earthy yellow stripe. See the official website for the academy. This article was written at a time when uniform (as I prefer to understand the word) had been abolished. I did not foresee a time it would ever return again, as it has with the academy. That is therefore the context of the final paragraphs below.

It was therefore, regrettably only a matter of time before someone took the by then inevitable step of abolishing the Adwick Uniform. At the end of the day, a uniform is the expression of the community that wears it; and when there is no consensus for keeping it, no amount of force will save it. There is a world of difference between the last dying vestiges of Adwick Uniform and its living, proud expression of the former generation.

In our day, the uniform fulfilled a role, and both we and our parents wanted it. Yet to be fair too, that was a bygone age, with different values. Today the community had to make a choice: it had either to abolish school uniform altogether or put its weight behind the concept. Clearly it has chosen to do the first.

Now the Adwick uniform is history. It is my firm opinion that whatever the rights or wrongs of its abolition, the uniform is [also] important history. Children today and tomorrow should know about it, because it was an essential part of being a child in school for many generations. History is about how we understand ourselves, and with the demise of classical school uniform at Adwick, it is even more important to keep it living in historical discussions and study.

Description of the Older Uniform

Girls Green or grey skirt; otherwise as boys except blazer optional

Boys White shirt

School Tie (pictured) – green, white, black diagonal stripes

Black trousers

Green Adwick Blazer

Black V-neck – green and white stripes at “V” and arms

In addition came the optional school scarf. This had parallel stripes of green, white, and black – though interestingly the black colour band was a little larger than the green colour band. The white band came in the middle, and like the stripe on the tie was the smallest.

The school scarf was never widely used. I had one, but unfortunately I have no pictures of it.

The school tie I still have today. It is pictured at the top.

Main Story In Both Blogs

Old School

This is where the last part of my formative years were spent – the main building of the former Adwick School soon to be demolished, along with the other buildings there. © Copyright Richard Rogerson and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Since my Norwegian blog was launched last year, I have maintained a twin blog system. I have one blog for English, another for Norwegian.

I intend continuing thus. The system has served my blogging needs very well, and further allowed me to be much more radical in my Norwegian (since May this year I have favoured Nynorsk over the more usual Bokmål). Nevertheless the matter relating to my former school merits coverage in both blogs. Because of this, I have also made an exception in just this case alone, and you will find an English translation of the original Norwegian post on the Norwegian blog itself.

The translation is but that, and is therefore on a separate page. The alternative would have been to put the translation on this blog, as I have before. However, in this case both blogs will be covering what effectively is the end of an important part of my formative years. That is why I feel I have to cover these developments on my personal blogs. It is “front page” stuff in a sense.

Both blogs will therefore continue with their own separate identities, but the Norwegian one will also cover this story from its own angle.

Ruins of A Lost World

The old Adwick Logo

The Old School Logo and Colours

Readers of my English blog must surely have noticed one issue dominating recent posts. The school I went to in Great Britain is going to be demolished!

It is called Outwood Academy Adwick, but in my time was simply called Adwick School. In 2002 the school had just come out of special measures, and the name was changed. It was then called the North Doncaster Technology College. Two years ago it changed its name yet again – to the name the school has today.

Last year there was such a controversy over plans for this new school that even I got to hear about the matter here (in Norway). That happened when I was reading Doncaster news on the Internet. They were going to raise a whole new school building, and as if that were not enough, the old one was going to be completely demolished! Needless to say this caused no small stir among previous pupils (note: Adwick School was called Percy Jackson Grammar previous to 1968).

Those protests did not succeed, and the plans were approved. The work began and since then things have proceeded very rapidly. The new school buildings are now almost complete, and in not so many days they will be moving out of the old school. My school’s days are therefore now numbered.

Today’s academy has just published pictures of the new construction, showing its situation in relationship together with the old. I can see that the new school is very good. It is of course built for the needs of today, whereas that I went to is from another time. I must acknowledge this shows.

Nevertheless I do feel some emotion when I look at these pictures. This is the place I was once a boy, and it was here my world was then so new! As I now see the tired old and quite dilapidated buildings (especially the old senior wing), which in those days were not old and dilapidated – I see that really a world has passed.

That is what this matter boils down to: not just that I have grown old, but that that world to which my internal compass needle yet points, now has gone forever. These pictures show the last ruins of that forgotten time. Soon those too shall be forever gone.

Prisoner On Death Row

Adwick

Download all the old Adwick icons as an icon library by clicking here.

Thou shalt become our enduring myth. Reason there is we still remember thee – if only in contempt!

Soon shalt thou be gone. Some quip*,

they would like to press the button

when they finally despatch thee to eternity.

Methinks getting rid of thee will be much harder. Thou wilt haunt our collective memory,

long after thou hast gone.

Thou shalt be our Titanic; thy years our own Atlantis,

A story we are never finished with,

A legend living on within,

Powered by what we will not own:

our conscience and our loss.

Thou shalt be our lasting myth. Live thou long when thou art gone!